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Featured would you say the following statement is true?

Discussion in 'Chemistry' started by reefloat, Nov 27, 2013.

?
  1. yes

    10 vote(s)
    43.5%
  2. no

    8 vote(s)
    34.8%
  3. maybe

    5 vote(s)
    21.7%
  4. dont know

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. reefloat

    reefloat Registered

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    regular water changes will prevent high nitrate accumulation!
     
  2. ged@fishnochips

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    From my understanding, smaller regular water changes are the least efficient method of exporting nutrients.

    If you change 10% then you potentially reduce nitrates by 10% but if you do another 10% change, then you are not reducing Nitrates by another 10% as some of the water is already new so to speak anyway. And you would be changing a percentage of that water as well. Confused you will be.

    However, I did hear this on the internet, so it must be true. ;)
     
  3. reefloat

    reefloat Registered

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    but then by your own admission whatever % you are reducing it you ARE reducing it, or have I misinterpreted? also when you say its the least efficient method what is the most efficient?
    (I can see me regretting this question)
     
  4. ged@fishnochips

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    Lets say week 1 we do 10 % water change, and reduce Nitrates by 10%

    Week 2 - 10% water change, x amount reduced, but in that 7 day period Nitrates have built up again

    And so on......

    So the only real effective way by water changes is large water changes more often than weekly. Which can then be detrimental.

    Cheato / NoPox / Skimming etc are more efficient from my understanding. I may of course be wrong though.
     
  5. Galvinized

    Galvinized Registered

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    Technically speaking I suppose water changes do help to reduce the accumulation of nitrate but is it the solution to the problem, then no!
    Water changes are a useful tool for many reasons but won't permanently fix the reasons for excess NO3.
     
  6. smiler

    smiler Registered

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    Over time though with weekly smaller water changes would you not reduce the overall amount of nitrates. Yes you will be changing some of the newer water but overall would you not replace more of the older water? Just throwing my 2 pence worth in lol
     
  7. Galvinized

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    Larger water changes will have more benefit than smaller.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. reefloat

    reefloat Registered

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    but remember the question guys - we are not talking about reducing the nitrate but preventing an accumulation :club:
     
  9. smiler

    smiler Registered

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    I suppose then weekly water changes Will go some way to prevent accumulation
     
  10. Galvinized

    Galvinized Registered

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    No, IMO. Water changes won't prevent an accumulation.
    It will help to reduce or dilute (whichever way you chose to look at it) the NO3 but if it's accumulating then there are other issues and (to put it bluntly) more cost effective ways of exporting the excess.
     
  11. ged@fishnochips

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    Thats ambiguous Gordon what size water changes if they are too small and more nitrates are added than taken away then no

    If less nitrates are added so to speak and regular water changes are done (as in more out than in) then I suppose they could do

    Bear in mind plenty of people do not do regular water changes and dont have an accumulation nor an increse of nitrates as they use other methods
     
  12. killi

    killi Moderator & Jedi Master

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    Water changes never hurt anything if they're done properly i.m.o., but they're a terrible way to reduce nitrates. It will be a real uphill fight as your fish are peeing ammonium all the time and that is inevitably going to end up as nitrate, and if a tank doesn't have much capacity to reduce nitrate. I'd read some of the other nitrate threads for ideas on a more positive and sustainable ways to do this.
     
  13. Galvinized

    Galvinized Registered

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    Good way to look at it.

    Thinking about "preventing the accumulation". Would it be possible to reach an equilibrium whereby whatever no3 was being produced was equal to the amout removed/diluted by the water change.
    So over time those parameters would remain relatively stable. And if you were to stop changing water they would then rise.
    So does it help prevent the accumulation, I suppose you could say yes it does. It stops it from accumulation any further but dose it actually get to the root of the problem, then no.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2013
  14. reefloat

    reefloat Registered

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    thank you all, think the answer then sums up as "yes, ..but"
    I asked the question only because I came upon this generalised site that raises the subject and as GED said you hear everything on the internet and difficult to interpret sometimes what is fact or just opinion, obviously as I make water changers any reference to the subject is of interest (you would not believe some of the questions I get asked) here is the reference for anyone interested How to Reduce or Lower Highly Toxic Nitrates in Your Saltwater Aquarium Quickly & Efficiently
     
  15. leopardshark

    leopardshark Registered

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    Water changes are a method of diluting no3 ..

    To other methods are assimilation ie charro,caleurpa etc..

    Thirdly then there is denitrification reactors and stuff..
     
  16. Eyore

    Eyore Guest

    I would say if water change is your Only method of no3 export you have a problem
     
  17. rabbut

    rabbut Registered

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    I went with Maybe due to ambiguous wording. If you'd asked "Will regular water changes help prevent nitrate buildup" then the answer will be yes, but you need more information to say if they will prevent it completely. The answer to your way of wording it will depend on what you consider a buildup to look like, what your rate of nutrient import is, what other methods of export you have and the size of the water changes you're doing with what regularity.
     
  18. screwloose

    screwloose Registered

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    Nothing wrong with accumulation, as long as it's gradual, sooner or later they will get to a level that your system will maintain
     
  19. screwloose

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    The thing better than water changes is good biological filtration, live rock, sand beds, etc
     
  20. jas

    jas Registered

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    The only way that statement cannot be true, is if the WC water contains NO3. Otherwise it must be true. If a reefer has too many fish and/ or feeds too much then eventhough the statement is true. The benefit may not show.
     
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