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Copperband (Chelmond Rostratus)

Discussion in 'Help and Advice' started by TheGreatBear, May 17, 2015.

  1. TheGreatBear

    TheGreatBear Registered

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    I am thinking of getting a copperband. From people experience would it eat my shrimp/snails I have a fire shrimp and a boxer and dong want them being dinner. Also from peoples experience how is best to get them settled and eating etc?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. slash_halen

    slash_halen <span style="color:#088A4B">SPS Help & Advice

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    They will be fine with the shrimp, the only thing my copperband goes for are the legs (whatever they are called) on my pincushion urchin.

    How old is your tank?

    Do you have any tangs in there currently?
     
  3. TheGreatBear

    TheGreatBear Registered

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    tank is just a 5-6 weeks now, red sea reefer 350 so a 4 footer, setup with colony and dead sand/rock. Current stock 4 anthias, 2 percula clowns (tiny babies), 1 flame angel, 4 hermits, 4 snails, fire shrimp, boxer shrimp and will have a labouti wrasse going in in next couple of week. Was thinking of getting one of these as the 'large fish' to go in last after the wrasse just planning ahead really. Thought tank would be just on the small side for a tang would like a powder blue but like I say bit of a push.
     
  4. slash_halen

    slash_halen <span style="color:#088A4B">SPS Help & Advice

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    I don't want to sould like a t**t lol, but if it was me I would wait until the tank is 6 months old.

    The reason being is that copperbands often feed during the night, eating any amphipods, worms etc it can find. So I would allow a good time for these creatures to populate to a large number before adding one. IMO a copperband is extremely difficult to keep long term with only frozen food, so an established tank with full of life will provide you a far greater chance of keeping one in the long run.

    If you have a refugium then that also adds in your favour. If you don't then I would consider adding one or alternatively add some filter wool to your sump. Amphipods and bristle worms love to live in filter wool because of all the detritus it collects. Mine is always teaming with life when I change the wool in my detritus trap.

    Not having tangs also adds in your favour, it would be difficult to add a copperband to a tank that size that already hosts a tang.

    That is my opinion anyhow. A few more things to look out for is the general health of the specimen in the LFS. Make sure it's eating well, has a good belly (avoid thin specimens) and watch it for 5 minutes to make sure it's not shaking it's head (often a sign of flukes).
     
  5. TheGreatBear

    TheGreatBear Registered

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    Nothing [email protected] about it this is why I am asking. Refugium was my next step, how would u go about it? What light would you get? I would prefer LED for power usage and so not to effect temp, any suggestions?
     
  6. StarfishEnterprise

    StarfishEnterprise Registered

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    Iv just had to remove my copperband which iv had 6 months. The problem being since adding a Purple Tang and a Moorish Idol the idol has taken a dislike to him and the purple is greedy. Often the copperband is pushed out when feeding. The Idol will chase him away and over the last week/10 days iv seen him weight plummet.
    Luckily it was an easy catch and he is now in a seperate QT facility where i hope to feed him up before selling him on.
    Matt is correct with long term food issues. Mine has eaten all Aiptasia, fan worms and any other worm like critter. This could also be a reason the weight loss.
    I recently used a converted fishing bait feeder stuffed with food to allow the Copperband to pick away while the other fish couldnt reach the food.
    Although this worked it was temporary until the Idol decided it was his and forced the Copperband away.

    Matt what frozen foods available are best for Copperbands? Mine has struggled to eat Mysis and Muscles. Certainly wont touch flake or pellet.
     
  7. slash_halen

    slash_halen <span style="color:#088A4B">SPS Help & Advice

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    You have a few options, for me chaeto should definitely be used along with lighting in the 5500-6500k spectrum. Judging based on your potential bio load I would think 2 x 10w LEDs will be sufficient:

    LED link: PAR30 10W 14W 18W LED Dimmable Ceiling Spot light bulb Lamp Day White Warm White | eBay

    These LEDs emit very low heat and grow chaeto like crazy. I use to use a 65w CFL lamp, and if i were to give that 10 out of 10, then these LEDs would be an 8 out of 10. So they're a great option and along with the low heat, they become the better option.

    You could also add either a Miracle mud bed or a dsb (deep sand bed) to boost denitratification whilst also benefitting from the extra critters that will live in this bed. IMO i would opt for Miracle Mud (not Mineral Mud) because you can get away with an 1 inch deep bed and have more room for the chaeto to grow. You could use caulerpa if you wanted too. MM also provides other benefits.

    You can set them up pretty easily, you just have to empty the sump chamber, add the MM or DSB, cover the bed with plastic bags, refilled the chamber slowly with airline/RO piping, cycle the sump for an hour using a filter sock to capture the floating particles, then start the return pump into your display.

    Chopped up Polychaetes, they probably have the highest protein value amongst the frozen foods available to us, plus this is what they eat in the wild. Saying that it took me weeks of persistance to get my copperband to eat it.

    I don't like recommending garlic, but for a temporary period it maybe worth mixing some garlic and brine shrimp in with some mysis, and over a few days reduce the amount of garlic and brine shrimp in the food mix. If you still struggle to get it to feed anything with high protein then its worth considering adding selcon to the food by defrozing the food, draining it, and adding some drops over the food. Then leave it overnight for
    the food to absorb it. You can also use squid oil, this is supposed to be high in amino acids.
     
  8. TheGreatBear

    TheGreatBear Registered

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    thanks for the help :)
     
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