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carbon, nitrate, phosphate remover in freshwater

Discussion in 'Freshwater Section - The Fresh Box' started by Wayne23uk, Apr 26, 2015.

  1. Wayne23uk

    Wayne23uk Registered

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    Is it recommended to use carbon is a freshwater tank, Also what levels should nitrate and phosphate be should I be using removers for these too as my last tank was a reef i used all of these but not much seems to be said on freshwater

    Thanks
    Wayne
     
  2. GlassWalker

    GlassWalker Registered

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    It depends on how you want to run the tank. Most don't run carbon unless there is a specific reason, such as removing medications or tannins.

    Nitrate and phosphate are more of an area for argument. If you run a planted tank, basically don't worry about it. Some livestock may or may not be sensitive to higher levels of nitrate but routine maintenance should take care of that. I'm not aware of any good de-nitrators for freshwater anyway, as it boils down to costly id-ionisation resins. Phosphates are less mentioned. In case of algae problems, generally starving them out doesn't work, and reducing light is a control method.
     
  3. LWT

    LWT Registered

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    Nitrates and phosphates are generally kept under control by performing large water changes. As there's no salt (expense) to consider then it's just easier this way. This does of course depend on whether the fish you keep are happy in your local water ie Discus in the north, Rift lake cichlids in the south. I'm in the North and our local tap water is very soft which is very convenient for me as I now keep wild freshwater angelfish. All I do is run my tap water through a HMA, heat it and do a water change. I do a 240 Litre water change twice a week ( on a 1200L tank) which I would never contemplate if it was salt water.
     
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