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Featured Are Fish In More Healthy In A Reef Type System Or In A Fish Only System?

Discussion in 'Fish Health' started by les, Oct 16, 2017.

  1. les

    les Registered

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    So what do you think and what are your experiences with keeping fish in a reef system and a fish only system, in your experience were/are your fish more healthy than in the other and if so why?
    Personally, my fish seem more comfortable in my reef than when I had a fish only system but that was many many moons ago and of course things have changed greatly.
     
  2. doug_amanda

    doug_amanda Moderator Staff Member

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    Don't think there should be a difference.
    But I think more attention is placed on water quality in a reef system which must be beneficial to the fish.
     
  3. Afonso

    Afonso Registered

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    I never had a fish only system but am sure we look after them more in a reef, only bad thing is we are limited with reef safe species


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  4. steve861uk

    steve861uk Registered

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    Depends on the fish I suppose. Some are prone to disease (and stress) in whatever system they are in, i.e. powder blue tangs and ich.

    Never had fish only, unless you include sink and swim our fancy goldfish (had them for 7 years) :D
     
  5. les

    les Registered

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    I have had one fish only tank while also running a reef tank. My guess is if you put fish in something akin to their natural habitat then you may be creating less stress fo them. This is what I try to do with my reef tank. Most of my fish (all bar my regal angel in fact) are fish which hang out on or within the reef rather than open water species like tangs and larger angels. One day my small regal will probably become too big and I will have to consider moving it on. My guess is if you not only consider water quality, suitable tank mates and food but also the fishes natural environment then the result will be happy fish and happy fish make for healthy fish.
     
  6. steve861uk

    steve861uk Registered

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    My clowns have been adopted by my chromis and so they all hang out together, which alas means my nem does not get a look in (nor looked at by the clowns) :confused::) But as you say they are all happy, healthy fish :)
     
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  7. les

    les Registered

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    Just playing devils advocate here (feel free to with it to me:2guns:) Chromis and clowns in the wild would not normally group together so perhaps by doing so they are in some way showing their unhappiness and going for safety in numbers. In the wild no clownfish is found without a host anemone, it wouldn;t last long at all and be eaten. What nem and what clowns do you have?
     
  8. steve861uk

    steve861uk Registered

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    2x mocha clowns, they hang with the chromis most of the time, but not all (is very entertaining to watch them).

    Nem is a green bubble tip that I've had for approx. 3 weeks (about 6 inches across now) and the clowns are most probably hatched in captivity and don't know what a nem is for :risas3::risas3:, they used to be hosted by my Duncan, but just seem to want to be free spirits at the mo :).

    I've had the clowns for a year and the chromis for about 10 months (they used to be in my old system).

    I'd definitely say that they are happy, funny and very lively fish and always have been :).
     
  9. steve861uk

    steve861uk Registered

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    @les - Bring in the clowns :risas3: (they are a bit darker now that they are older).

    Mocha Clowns.jpg

    and the BTA:

    BTA.jpg
     
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  10. Jellyfisch

    Jellyfisch Registered

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    OK, first, we have one too many 'in's in the title and it is 'healthier', not 'more healthy'! Or 'have more health', if you wish to use the noun......:aaaaa:

    However, over the decades, I have found a reef system is always healthier for the inhabitants, fish or not, as we have much more diversity and amusements for the fish. Downside is always compatability with lower animals. Wrasses will eat smaller crustaceans, while many corals suffer from grazing. You know the story. Still, one has to decide what one wishes to maintain. Fish alone can be very beautiful, as well as considerably less chemistry work than the reef. Maybe time and interest are the governing factors, which makes the question moot. When I think back on my own fish-only systems, they were more cages for my pets than environments. Big angels, triggerfish, etc. In a reef tank unwise inhabitants. Health was not are larger or smaller issue. In general, I have found established reef tanks more likely to remain disease-free, probasbly for a variety of reasons, but close to impossible to medicate, should a disease crop-up. All poisons must be fed to the fish and fingers crossed.
     
  11. les

    les Registered

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    Thanks for the English lesson glad you answered the question in the end. I think you mean yes in answer to it.
     
  12. Mr Dave

    Mr Dave Registered

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    I think as long as you have plenty of hiding/resting place for them then I can not see it being detrimental Les, the only benefit I see them getting from a reef is the opportunistic feed from any hitch hikers that may have come along with corals.
     
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  13. les

    les Registered

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    There may be something in what you say but I also think a more natural environment helps. I am not sure any real studies have been undertaken, however. With a lot of reef fish esp those that stay close to their bolt holes etc the feeling of security must help reduce stress levels and as we know stress or less of it plays an important part in many fishes health.
     
  14. Mr Dave

    Mr Dave Registered

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    Like you say Les the fish need to feel safe. A tip and something I always try to do when scaping is to build caves and tunnels to give the fish an escape
     
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  15. les

    les Registered

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    Probably a case of horses for courses.
     
  16. Staypuft

    Staypuft Registered

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    I'm lucky enough to have both types and I have to agree about the reef seeming to provide the fish less stress. My reef system is nearly 6 years old and my fish only, a mere year - this could be an indicator of my observations. I think tank size and rock content could also provide different outcomes - my fish is 2/3rds the size of my reef with about 1/2 the rock.
     
    les likes this.